#AutumnStatement : UK Property Market

Property Highlights

  • Capital Gains Tax loophole closed

From April 2015, overseas investors will face a capital gains tax bill on any profits they make from UK property. It is only fair to make overseas investors pay capital gains tax (28%) on the profit they make when they sell their UK properties. That is what British second homeowners are required to do, so why not foreign investors too.

  • £1bn made available for property development loans

£1 billion of loan money is to be made available to councils wanting to fund new housing developments in Manchester, Leeds and elsewhere (expected to create 250,000 homes). House building is up by 29% on last year. It is a figure warmly welcomed by construction firms such as Persimmon, Barratt and Taylor Wimpey, though many large financial firms such as L&G insist house building should be a much higher and more urgent priority.

For Help to Buy, Virgin and Aldermore will be offering mortgages too.

  • Aim to keep interest rates low

The aim of many tight regulations in banking and financial industries is to encourage responsible lending and so it is possible to maintain low interest rates. This is vital to the general economy and must be fought against rising house prices. So house prices will need to be kept under control.

 What does this mean for a property investor?

Autumn Statement UK Property Capital Gains TaxFirstly if you are a foreign investor then much of the benefit you got have been diminished. However if you are not, this is great news. It will mean that foreign investors may start to put there money else where. This means there will be less competition from “Cash Oversea’s buyers” when you are after a property. Prices should also correct accordingly. Overall a good policy for UK property buyers and also the increased tax revenue will help the public too.

Funding for house building and developments will increase housing supply and keep construction jobs strong. However will this only benefit the house builders who sell at inflated prices? Possibly. The impact on the normal UK property investor will be minimal.

Low interest rates are welcome for investors, however it depends if new finance is available. Overall it will at least mean that investors’ current mortgage payments stay low.

Overall a good Autumn Statement for the UK Property investor.

 

 

How to calculate your REAL return on Investment: 5% becomes 35%

The REAL Return on Investment

Traditionally property return on investment is calculated by rental yield, especially when it is being compared to returns of other types of investments. However I believe it is a much more exact science, and can vary significantly depending on specific properties and on how the investor structured the deal when purchasing the property. A traditional yield of 5% can actually be 35% if the deal is right.

Let me start with a simple example. A two bedroom flat, bought with standard Buy-to-let 75% finance, at 5% interest only for £200,000 that is renting out for £10,000 per year. Traditional yield will be 5% (rent/value=10/200=5%). Under the way I calculate it, the rent less the mortgage interest divided by initial money in, therefore for this deal ((£10,000-£7,500)/ £50,000) so its 5%. The “real” return on investment is still the same.

But wait, what about capital gains, this is still a form of returns even though they may only be realised at a much later stage when selling and that will be liable for Capital Gains Tax. Well that is not strictly true, if the investor remortgages again after a year with similar terms, 75% of the capital gain can be realised. So if we make a very conservative and modest assumption in present gloomy market conditions of a 5% increase in value that is £10,000 and if we take 75%, and add it to the surplus cash from earlier that is a total of £10,000 return, effectively 20% return on the deposit paid. That is an amazing return, which I can’t see any other form of investment where the risks are so low and the investor has so much control over the asset.

There are certain things we have not considered like remortgage costs, legal and stamp duty, maintenance, and tenants. These will of course change calculations. Also the reason I simplify with a interest only mortgage, because if it was repayment that add to the capital or equity of the property so in effect cancels out the cost, although in realisation it will only be 75% realised when remortgaged.

Let’s be a bit more adventurous now, and add a few more clever changes to the model. We have to cap the borrowing at 75% LTV because that is the realistic maximum in the current lending condition. Let’s say the purchase price was 15% BMV (below market value) but the Mortgage was LTV, and the investor used a £10,000 personal loan at 10% compounded with capital and repayment due in two years, to part gather the deposit. So the initial investment in, is £10,000, the rest is the personal loan and the BMV saving. Assuming rent is steady; let’s look at the situation in 2 years time.

Property value in two years is now £220,500, so a refinance would raise an £15,375, less the loan that needs to be paid back (£12,100), plus £5,000 rent surplus which means £8,275 cash inflow, or 82.75% over two years on what was invested, so that is 35% return on capital invested per year.

There are incredible deals available; you can look around yourself, internet sites, auctions, personal contacts. If all else fails, contact us, info@PropVestment.com. You have to be clever with the way you invest, market condition are against us so we must beat the system and be innovative in our thinking.

Please take caution in tricky deals and do all your due diligence, the figures I use are fictional but are close to what is really possible.

How do you calculate your return on investment?

QFKUDEMEN4KX

 

Stagnant UK Property Market: Sellers’ Perspective

It has been widely reported that the current market conditions are such with very low volume of transactions, falls in mortgage approvals, and an overall stagnation in the UK property market.

House Price Crash shows very clearly the levels of mortgage approvals and the graph illustrates this with fine detail. Click on the link.

The amount of new mortgage approvals for house purchase, (but not yet lent), rose to 45,940 in May 2011 from 45,447 in April. However May’s approval figure was lower than the average for the previous six months despite the slight increase, according to figures released by the Bank of England.

Nationwide’s index has prices remaining stagnant since May, and down 1.1% annually, while Halifax has prices up 0.1 % in the same month and down 4.2% annually, while the Land Registry has prices down 2.3% annually. Overall there is clear evidence of stagnation in the market.

It is important to analyse the factors causing this and the mind set of Sellers’ and what is causing them difficulties.

Once again today the UK Base rate was held again at 0.5% for the 28th month running. It will be interesting to see the divide in the Bank of England committee when the minutes are released.

Lending to individuals

At PropVestment we sight two major problems causing this stagnation. Firstly Sellers are too over optimistic, thinking that their property should have risen along the same rise levels as seen before the credit crunch, and cannot come to terms with a possible drop in value, so they set their asking price above what is realistically achievable and representive of their property.
This means that many properties stay on the market longer, the few that are closer to realistic values and are lucky enough to attract attention of the buyers suffer from a secondary factor. Price agreed, next step acquire a mortgage approval.
When the bank valuer goes to value the property, its significantly undervalued relative to the asking price, the mortgage offer comes at a LTV of this valuation, leaving the buyer with a shortage to complete. Result, the deal falls through.

Why should a seller sell? Well with current interest rates, many PropVestors have mortgages around the 1-2% mark, they are enjoying a healthy surplus on rents and selling just means, realising Capital Gains Tax.

Therefore if one does not need funds else where, logic says to stay put, not sell and lose a chunk to the tax man and instead enjoy the cake of higher rental yields to mortgage installments.

Further as stated in our last article, it has been stated that rents, in particular in Central London, are expected to rise 8-10% in the year to come. Investors are well placed to get great returns. Especially where the mortgage costs are not looking to rise due to the base rate on hold.

The UK mortgage market is still quite inactive, even though data is showing an recent increase, from our personal experience and that of our clients, the lending criteria is very strict and stringent and only those that fall into a model profile, income base, age and credit history are the ones where mortgages are being approved. Further to this the LTV (Loan to Value) is still surprisingly low in comparison to boom times. Sellers do not want to accept the lower valuations and feel their properties hold more value so will not sell at current market prices.

PropVestment concludes that from a sellers’ perspective the primary factor why sellers are not as active as they would like to be is simply that the returns are just too good, and staying put is the best option. Even those looking to sell, find the potential buyers are not capable of securing the finance to meet asking prices.

LENDERS START LENDING, SELLERS & VALUERS GET REALISTIC

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Stagnant UK Property Market: Buyers Perspective

It has been widely reported that the current market conditions are such with very low volume of transactions, falls in mortgage approvals, and an overall stagnation in the UK property market.

Stagnant

Nationwide reported that house prices rose 0.3% in April but are still down 1.2% on last year.

The number of houses sold in May was up 4.7% on the previous month’s figures and reached the highest level seen since May last year.
House sales were 2.0% fewer than May 2010 but significantly up 14.7% on May 2009 and 18.6% up on May 2008. The recovery was led mainly by activity recorded in the North of England and the Midlands. This is very encouraging.
There was positive news for the number of new ‘For Sale’ instructions received in May. In the UK they were up 1.7% eradicating the -0.5% drop seen in April.

It is important to analyse the factors causing this and the mind set of Buyers, and there finally seems some light at the end of the tunnel.

Just today the UK Base rate was held again at 0.5% for yet another month, all indications suggest that there will be no drastic upwards movement. Therefore many home owners and investors are content with staying with existing properties where they are enjoying very low interest rates often just a fraction over the base rate, if they were to sell off current properties and find new ones, it is almost impossible that they will be able to gain similar rates. They conclude it is better to stay put and use the extra savings to pay off capital rather than buy or sell into new properties.
However with such a low base rate saving rates are also very low, which with current inflation figures mean that real return is actually negative.

PropVestors are better placed to either put extra cash into paying off capital or reinvesting in property rather than having money thats losing money in ISAs or savings accounts.

Investors are seeing much better returns on rentals rather than the negative real return of having money in a savings account.

In other property news today it has been stated that rents in particular in Central London are expected to rise 8-10% in the year to come. Investors are well placed to get great returns. Current renters should also think about becoming FTBs (First Time Buyers)  to avoid high rent increases and instead use the low base rate to get on the property ladder. With these factors there should be upwards pressure on demand and property prices, so what is holding back the market?

The UK mortgage market is still very inactive, even though data is showing a recent increase, from our personal experience and that of our clients the lending criteria is very strict and stringent and only those that fall into a model profile, income base, age, and credit history are the ones where mortgages are being approved. Further to this the LTV (Loan to Value) is still surprisingly low in comparison to boom times.

PropVestment concludes that from a buyers perspective the primary factor why buyers are not as active as they would like to be is simply that the lending is just not available and with prices especially in the South East remaining so high. Even those lucky enough to secure finance, they just can not make the deposits needed to buy when the LTV offered is as low as it is.

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How to calculate your REAL return on Investment: 5% can becomes 35%

The REAL return on Invetsment

Traditionally property return on investment is calculated by rental yield, especially when it is being compared to returns of other types of investments. However I believe it is a much more exact science, and can vary significantly depending on specific properties and on how the investor structured the deal when purchasing the property. A traditional yield of 5% can actually be 35% if the deal is right.

Let me start with a simple example. A two bedroom flat, bought with standard Buy-to-let 75% finance, at 5% interest only for £200,000 that is renting out for £10,000 per year. Traditional yield will be 5% (rent/value=10/200=5%). Under the way I calculate it, the rent less the mortgage interest divided by initial money in, therefore for this deal ((£10,000-£7,500)/ £50,000) so its 5%. The “real” return on investment is still the same.

But wait, what about capital gains, this is still a form of returns even though they may only be realised at a much later stage when selling and that will be liable for Capital Gains Tax. Well that is not strictly true, if the investor remortgages again after a year with similar terms, 75% of the capital gain can be realised. So if we make a very conservative and modest assumption in present gloomy market conditions of a 5% increase in value that is £10,000 and if we take 75%, and add it to the surplus cash from earlier that is a total of £10,000 return, effectively 20% return on the deposit paid. That is an amazing return, which I can’t see any other form of investment where the risks are so low and the investor has so much control over the asset.

There are certain things we have not considered like remortgage costs, legal and stamp duty, maintenance, and tenants. These will of course change calculations. Also the reason I simplify with a interest only mortgage, because if it was repayment that add to the capital or equity of the property so in effect cancels out the cost, although in realisation it will only be 75% realised when remortgaged.

Let’s be a bit more adventurous now, and add a few more clever changes to the model. We have to cap the borrowing at 75% LTV because that is the realistic maximum in the current lending condition. Let’s say the purchase price was 15% BMV (below market value) but the Mortgage was LTV, and the investor used a £10,000 personal loan at 10% compounded with capital and repayment due in two years, to part gather the deposit. So the initial investment in, is £10,000, the rest is the personal loan and the BMV saving. Assuming rent is steady; let’s look at the situation in 2 years time.

Property value in two years is now £220,500, so a refinance would raise an £15,375, less the loan that needs to be paid back (£12,100), plus £5,000 rent surplus which means £8,275 cash inflow, or 82.75% over two years on what was invested, so that is 35% return on capital invested per year.

There are incredible deals available; you can look around yourself, internet sites, auctions, personal contacts. If all else fails, contact us, info@PropVestment.com. You have to be clever with the way you invest, market condition are against us so we must beat the system and be innovative in our thinking.

Please take caution in tricky deals and do all your due diligence, the figures I use are fictional but are close to what is really possible.

How do you calculate your return on investment?

Where to Invest your Money: Property or Pension?

Property is the way

Lots of companies have massive holes, gaps, shortfalls in their pension funds because the stock market has performed so badly, or the decisions made on where to invest have been very poor by the company.

If you are like the masses you probably have a defined contribution pension scheme.  The risk falls 100% to you. All the scheme defines is what you have to give them!

Let us do the maths, making a few assumptions along the way, based on our experiences. Read more