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Stamp Duty

Stamp Duty changes: #AS2014

#SDLT (Stamp Duty Land Tax) has been totally reformed in the Autumn Statement by George Osbourne. First time buyers gain, and buyers of property over £937,500 lose out.

98% of people who will be paying Stamp Duty will pay less

Under the new rules Stamp Duty will follow a scale similar to income tax, with thresholds where the rate is due proportionally.

New Stamp Duty

What is the impact on First Time Buyers or regular home owners?

First time buyers will benefit. Under the new rules first time buyers will pay on average £400 less. The average price paid for a first home is £210,000. Under the old system the rate was 1% on the whole amount therefore £2,100. However under the new system only amount above £125,00 so ££85,000 is taxed at 2% totaling £1,700.

What is the impact on Property Developers?

For property developers the new is not so good. With so many sites coming in over the £1m mark, property developers will be hit hard. In Particular those in London and the South East where even the smallest sites come in over the £937,500 threshold from which point the effective rate is higher under the new system.

SDLT Autumn Statement

The critics are calling this move George Osbourne’s own engineering of the Mansion Tax. However this will definitely help smaller, less affluent families and most of all first time buyers. The upper end rates are really quite high and will impact small developers more, who operate on a smaller scale and rarely get other subsidies like the larger ones.

It must be noted that these rates and changes do not affect commercial property, therefore many developments may not be harmed that much.

Will this reduce or increase the net proceeds to the treasury?

In conclusion, this is a positive move by the Chancellor, it just waits to be seen how this translates for first time buyers and conversely with property developers in reality.

#AutumnStatement : UK Property Market

Property Highlights

  • Capital Gains Tax loophole closed

From April 2015, overseas investors will face a capital gains tax bill on any profits they make from UK property. It is only fair to make overseas investors pay capital gains tax (28%) on the profit they make when they sell their UK properties. That is what British second homeowners are required to do, so why not foreign investors too.

  • £1bn made available for property development loans

£1 billion of loan money is to be made available to councils wanting to fund new housing developments in Manchester, Leeds and elsewhere (expected to create 250,000 homes). House building is up by 29% on last year. It is a figure warmly welcomed by construction firms such as Persimmon, Barratt and Taylor Wimpey, though many large financial firms such as L&G insist house building should be a much higher and more urgent priority.

For Help to Buy, Virgin and Aldermore will be offering mortgages too.

  • Aim to keep interest rates low

The aim of many tight regulations in banking and financial industries is to encourage responsible lending and so it is possible to maintain low interest rates. This is vital to the general economy and must be fought against rising house prices. So house prices will need to be kept under control.

 What does this mean for a property investor?

Autumn Statement UK Property Capital Gains TaxFirstly if you are a foreign investor then much of the benefit you got have been diminished. However if you are not, this is great news. It will mean that foreign investors may start to put there money else where. This means there will be less competition from “Cash Oversea’s buyers” when you are after a property. Prices should also correct accordingly. Overall a good policy for UK property buyers and also the increased tax revenue will help the public too.

Funding for house building and developments will increase housing supply and keep construction jobs strong. However will this only benefit the house builders who sell at inflated prices? Possibly. The impact on the normal UK property investor will be minimal.

Low interest rates are welcome for investors, however it depends if new finance is available. Overall it will at least mean that investors’ current mortgage payments stay low.

Overall a good Autumn Statement for the UK Property investor.